29.11.17

10 Things to Do This Week (November 30 to December 06, 2017)

1.Workshops
Mumbai
Eco Kids is organising a gardening workshop for all young and enthusiastic nature lovers.
Date: December 1
Age: 3 to 6 years
Call: 09821127658
Website: www.ecokids.in
New Delhi
The Learning Place has organised a Christmas Fair where children can learn crafts and try their hand at learning experiments.
Date: December 2
Age: 3+ years
Call: 011-43535414

Bangalore
The Dum Dama Dum: Children’s Theatre and Reading Festival by Atta Galatta will introduce children to drama and play reading. Here, participants willmeet their favourite authors and will be introduced to characters from their favourite books.
Date: December 1 to 3
Age: 3+ years
Call: 080-41600677

Pune
The Swadhaa Waldorf Learning Centre is organising a Lippan art workshop. Lippan is traditional artwork from Kutch, Gujarat. In this workshop, one will learn to work with simple materials such as clay, chalk powder, varied shapes of mirrors and sawdust.
Date: Ongoing
Age: 8+ years
Call: 07264911771

2. Read a Book
Discover India State by State: Off to Gujarat by Sonia Mehta (Age: 8+ years) 
This book is part of the 'Discover India State by State' series by Sonia Mehta, which is about Mishki and Pushka—a brother and sister duo from planet Zoomba who travel to Earth. Here, they meet a sweet old man called Daadu Dolma who tells them wonderful stories and facts about India. In 'Off to Gujarat', Mishki and Pushka discover the vibrant culture and hidden secrets of the beautiful cities of Gandhinagar, Bhavnagar, Ahmedabad, Rajkot, Palitana, Bhuj and Surat. They travel to the Rann of Kutch, which is actually an enormous salt desert! The book also introduces you to some mouth-watering Gujarati delights like faafda, jalebi, dhokla, thepla, khandvi and undhiyu! To know more about the rich culture of Gujarat, read this colourful book. Published by Penguin India and available on Amazon.in

3. Watch It 
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
'Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them' is a prequel to the Harry Potter series. This movie transports you to the world of ancient magic and uncovers mysterious creatures concealed in the muggle world.The film is the first instalment in the Fantastic Beasts series. Watch this movie to enter a secret world of witches and wizards.

4. Learn Something New
Quilling
Quilling is one of the most beautiful and creative ways to pass your time. It involves an easy technique that can be used to create large art pieces with minimal fuss. Quilled items can be stuck on a myriad of bases to create greeting cards, earrings, clips, glasses, candle stands and more. One can also use quilling to decorate one’s home during festivals with fun, creative and unique pieces.

5. Log On
www.thirteen.org/get-the-math
Get the Math is a website that helps tweens and teens build their mathematical skills and apply their knowledge of mathematics to the real world. The site showcases videos of various professionals using mathematics in their everyday life. The site also allows children to use their mathematical skills to solve real-life problems.

6. What's New?
Smartivity Pump It Move It Hydraulic Crane
This Smartivity kit includes all the equipment needed to make a crane, which once assembled, can be used to move reallife objects around.

The DIY hydraulic machine uses the power of water pressure to carry out specified tasks.

It thus teaches children the fundamentals of hydraulic machines in a playful manner. Available on Amazon.in

7. Pay it Forward 
Nanhi Kali 
Nanhi Kali was initiated in 1996 by the K C Mahindra Education Trust to provide primary education to underprivileged girl children in India. The NGO supports over 3,00,000 underprivileged girl children. Project Nanhi Kali is a participatory project where one can sponsor the education of an underprivileged girl child. One can sponsor a Nanhi Kali studying in class 1 to 5 for just `3,600 a year, while a secondary school student studying in class 6 to 10 can be sponsored by paying `4,800. The sponsor receives a photograph, profile and progress report of the Nanhi Kali they are sponsoring. Apart from sponsoring a child, one can also help the project by spreading word about it and volunteering at its events. To know more: Log on www.nanhikali.org

8. Little Green Finger 
Meet a New Plant: Darlingtonia Californica
Darlingtonia californica, commonly known as cobra lily or cobra plant, is a carnivorous plant found in the Himalayan ranges. Its name stems from the appearance of its tubular yellow to purplishgreen leaves that look like a rearing cobra with fangs. Interestingly, the plant is able to survive fire by regenerating from its roots. The cobra lily uses its nectar to lure insects into its pitcher traps. It then digests the soft parts of the insects and turns them into nitrogen compounds to compensate for the lack of nitrogen in the species' habitat.

9. Music For Your Ears 
Know your Instrument: Pakhawaj
Pronunciation: pakh-vaaj
Origin: India
The pakhawaj, also known as the mridang, is said to have inspired the tabla. The pakhawaj is usually used in the Dhrupad style of music. It is a barrel-shaped drum with two heads, which are made of layers of skin. The heads of the pakhawaj are expanded by leather straps that run along the sides of the body over small cylindrical wooden blocks that are used for tuning. Pandit Bhawani Shankar is one of India’s better known pakhawaj players.

10. Bit by the Travel Bug
Place to Visit: Assam
Assam is located in northeastern India and is one of India’s most beautiful and rustic states. When here, visit the Ahom structures in Sibsagar. The most fascinating structures here are Kareng Ghar, a palace with three underground floors, and Rang Ghar, the first amphitheatre in Asia. The Da-Parbatia Temple in Tezpur is the oldest and finest specimen of sculptural art in Assam. Its carvings belong to the early Gupta School of sculpture. The Assam State Museum in Guwahati is one of the largest multipurpose museums in India. The museum has separate sections for archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics and iconography.

(Stock Images Courtesy ThinkStock)

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